Installing

The recommended way of getting Folktale is through npm. If you don’t have Node installed yet, you should download a binary from the official website or use an installer like nvm.

NOTE
Folktale requires Node 6.x+ for its development tools, but you can use a prebuilt version of Folktale in Node 4.x+.

To install Folktale using npm, run the following in your command line:

$ npm install folktale

Contents

Folktale in Node.js

Node.js has native support for the CommonJS module system, which Folktale uses, thus in order to use Folktale you just require it:

const folktale = require('folktale');

folktale.core.lambda.identity(1); // ==> 1

Folktale in Electron / nw.js

Like Node.js, Electron and nw.js have native support for the CommonJS module system, so you load Folktale using require:

const folktale = require('folktale');

folktale.core.lambda.identity(1); // ==> 1

Folktale in the Browser

Browsers don’t have native support for CommonJS modules. We still recommend using a module system (like Browserify or WebPack) and bundling your modules to distribute your application. This allows you to only load the parts of Folktale that you use, reducing the amount of data you have to send to your users.

Using Browserify

First install Browserify from npm (you should have a package.json describing your application’s dependencies):

$ npm install browserify --save-dev

Then install Folktale through npm as well:

$ npm install folktale --save

Ideally, require only the Folktale modules you’ll be using. This helps keeping the overall size smaller. For example, if you’re using only the Maybe and compose functions, don’t load the library’s entry-point, just those modules:

const Maybe = require('folktale/maybe');
const compose = require('folktale/core/lambda/compose');

const inc = (x) => x + 1;
const double = (x) => x * 2;

Maybe.Just(1).map(compose(inc, double));
// ==> Maybe.Just(4)

To compile your application, run browserify on your entry-point module (you run this from the root of your project, where your package.json is located at):

$ ./node_modules/.bin/browserify index.js > my-app.js

Finally, load my-app.js in your webpage. This file will contain all of the modules you’ve required in your index.js file:

<!DOCTYPE html>
<html>
  <head>(...)</head>
  <body>
    (...)
    <script src="/path/to/my-app.js"></script>
  </body>
</html>

For more information about Browserify, check Browserify’s website.

Using WebPack

First install WebPack from npm (you should have a package.json describing your application’s dependencies):

$ npm install webpack --save-dev

Then install Folktale through npm as well:

$ npm install folktale --save

Ideally, require only the Folktale modules you’ll be using. This helps keeping the overall size smaller. For example, if you’re using only the Maybe and compose functions, don’t load the library’s entry-point, just those modules:

const Maybe = require('folktale/maybe');
const compose = require('folktale/core/lambda/compose');

const inc = (x) => x + 1;
const double = (x) => x * 2;

Maybe.Just(1).map(compose(inc, double));
// ==> Maybe.Just(4)

Create a webpack.config.js in your project’s root directory, containing instructions for how WebPack should build your application:

module.exports = {
  entry: './index.js',
  output: {
    filename: 'my-app.js'
  }
};

Finally, load my-app.js in your webpage. This file will contain all of the modules you’ve required in your index.js file:

<!DOCTYPE html>
<html>
  <head>(...)</head>
  <body>
    (...)
    <script src="/path/to/my-app.js"></script>
  </body>
</html>

For more information about WebPack, check WebPack’s website.

Using Folktale without a module system

While the recommended way of using Folktale is with a module system, it’s possible to use it without one as well. The drawback of not using a module system is that your website will have to ship the entire Folktale library to your users, even if you don’t use all of its features.

To use a prebuilt version, first, download one of the prebuilt releases on GitHub. Unpack the distribution file and add the dist/folktale.min.js or dist/folktale.js file to your website. Reference this file in your HTML like any other JavaScript file:

<!DOCTYPE html>
<html>
  <head>(...)</head>
  <body>
    (...)
    <script src="/path/to/folktale.min.js"></script>
  </body>
</html>

In your JavaScript code, the Folktale library will be available through the global variable folktale, unless you’re using a CommonJS or AMD module system in your webpage:

folktale.core.lambda.identity(1);
// ==> 1

NOTE: If you’re using a module system in your webpage (for example, AMD in Dojo or Require.js), then Folktale will be available through that module system under folktale.