…from Core.Lambda

Core.Lambda provided basic operations to combine and transform functions. Most of the important ones are still available in Folktale 2, but under a different module. This page provides migration instructions for each function in Core.Lambda. You can look at the full documentation for core/lambda for more detailed information.

Contents

identity(x)

The identity function remains the same in Folktale, so the only change required is changing the import expression for it.

Previously:

const { identity } = require('core.lambda');

Now:

const { identity } = require('folktale/core/lambda');

// Or importing only the identity function:
const identity = require('folktale/core/lambda/identity');

constant(x)(_)

Folktale 2 provides a simpler form of constant, which does no unrolling. If you’re not passing 2 arguments to constant, the only thing you need to do is change your import.

Previously:

const { constant } = require('core.lambda');

const one = constant(1);

Now:

const { constant } = require('folktale/core/lambda');

const one = constant(1);

// You can also load just the `constant` function:
const constant = require('folktale/core/lambda/constant');

If you’re relying on the unrolling behaviour, see curry(arity, f).

apply(f, x)

There’s no equivalent of apply in the Folktale 2. apply is generally the same as just referring to the function directly:

function inc(x){
return x + 1;
}


const { apply } = require('core.lambda');

const f = apply(inc);

// Same as:
const f = inc;

flip(f)(b)(a)

There’s no equivalent of flip in Folktale 2. Instead you should create a new function that changes the ordering of the parameters using an arrow function.

Previously:

function subtract(x, y) {
return x - y;
}

const { flip } = require('core.lambda');
const { unary } = require('core.arity');

[1, 2, 3].map(unary(flip(subtract)(1)));
// ==> [0, 1, 2]

Now:

[1, 2, 3].map(x => subtract(x, 1));
// ==> [0, 1, 2]

compose(f, g)(x)

Folktale 2 provides a compose function without the unrolling semantics. See the compose documentation for details.

If you’re using compose in the form compose(f, g)(x), then you only need to change your imports:

const inc    = (x) => x + 1;
const double = (x) => x * 2;

Previously:

const { compose } = require('core.lambda');
const incDouble = compose(double, inc);
incDouble(3);
// ==> 8

Now:

const { compose } = require('folktale/core/lambda');
const incDouble = compose(double, inc);
incDouble(3);
// ==> 8

If you’re using a single saturated call, you can either simplify the expression, or pass the argument as a separate call.

Previously:

const { compose } = require('core.lambda');
compose(double, inc, 3);
// ==> 8

Now:

const { compose } = require('folktale/core/lambda');
double(inc(3));
// ==> 8

compose(double, inc)(3);
// ==> 8

If you’re specifying just one of the functions to compose, or some other uncommon partial application, create a new function explicitly instead.

Previously:

const { compose } = require('core.lambda');
const thenDouble = compose(double);
thenDouble(inc)(3);
// ==> 8

Now:

const { compose } = require('folktale/core/lambda');
const thenDouble = (f, x) => double(f(x));
thenDouble(inc)(3);
// ==> 8

curry(arity, f)

Folktale 2 provides a curry function that’s very similar to the old one, with the difference that it’ll only unroll up to the provided arity. This avoids problems with Folktale trying to unroll application of non-curried function when interacting with variadic functions in JavaScript (for example, with Array#map). See the curry documentation for details.

The only thing you need to do is changing your imports.

function add(a, b) {
return a + b;
}

Previously:

const { curry } = require('core.lambda');
curry(2, add)(1)(2);
// ==> 3

Now:

const { curry } = require('folktale/core/lambda');
curry(2, add)(1, 2);
// ==> 3

spread(f, args)

Folktale 2 does not provide a spread equivalent. You can use an arrow function instead to apply an array as positional arguments.

Previously:

const { spread } = require('core.lambda');

xs.map(spread(someFunction));

Now:

xs.map(x => someFunction(...x));

uncurry(f)

Folktale 2 does not provide an uncurry equivalent, since curried functions are avoided through the library. In any case, uncurry is not necessary for functions curried with the curry operation, which already does unrolling.

Previously:

const { curry, uncurry } = require('core.lambda');

const add = curry(3, (x, y, z) => x + y + z);
uncurry(add)(1, 2, 3);
// ==> 6

Now:

const { curry } = require('folktale/core/lambda');

const add = curry(3, (x, y, z) => x + y + z);
add(1, 2, 3);
// ==> 6

upon(f, g)(a, b)

There’s no equivalent of upon in Folktale 2, use an arrow function.

function sort(xs, f) {
return xs.sort(f);
}

function compare(x, y) {
return x < y ? -1
: x > y ? 1
: /* else */ 0;
}

function first(xs) {
return xs[0];
}

Previously:

const { upon } = require('core.lambda');
const { binary } = require('core.arity');

sort([[1, 2], [3, 1], [-2, 4]], upon(compare, first));
// ==> [[-2, 4], [1, 2], [3, 1]]

Now:

sort([[1, 2], [3, 1], [-2, 4]], (x, y) => compare(first(x), first(y)));
// ==> [[-2, 4], [1, 2], [3, 1]]